Media Memo IV, to the White House

May 12, 2017

TO:   Kellyanne Conway, Sean Spicer, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, and others advising President Trump

FROM:   John Kerezy, an associate professor at a community college who’s also practiced public relations for 30+ years

RE:   Timing of negative news in the digital/mobile news cycle

DATE:   Friday, May 12, 2017 at 4 in the afternoon

This is the precise day of the week and the moment of the day in which you should have announced the firing of former FBI Director James Comey.

  1. Major news media outlets go into “weekend” mode by late Friday. The bad news released on a Friday afternoon doesn’t travel as long, or have as much legs, as something bad dropped on a Tuesday afternoon.
  2. It’s too late for the news networks to make major changes in the Sunday morning news analysis programs, so the bad news gets minimized on those programs.
  3. You know that negative coverage is inevitable in many instances. But you can mitigate it by better managing of when it happens. The late Larry Speakes, deputy press secretary to President Ronald Reagan, said, ”You don’t tell us how to stage the news and we don’t tell you how to cover it.”
  4. You lose opportunities to focus on tax cuts or other aspects of the Trump Administration’s policies when you have to keep dealing with negative news.
  5. You might have reduced President Trump’s need to Tweet explanations of the firing by at least 50 percent, thus keeping a national focus on much more important matters which our nation faces.

That’s it. Good luck in convincing the boss of this in the future.

SOME SOURCES FOR FOLLLOW-UP:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887324712504578133452941243908

http://www.nytimes.com/1984/04/06/us/the-bad-news-hour-4-pm-friday.html

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesleadershipforum/2012/05/30/10-commandments-for-delivering-bad-news/#7f218c072169

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=113804852

IMAGE SOURCE: https://www.inspirationde.com/image/57612/

 


MEDIA MEMO NO. 3: For the media and President Trump

February 22, 2017

Having heard some of President Donald J. Trump’s news conference on February 16, and having seen and read dozens of media stories about the first month of President Trump’s presidency, here five words of advice for both parties.

Stop fighting. Get along. Collaborate.

First – to the managers, directors, editors, publishers and reporters who comprise the media in 2017: To turn one of Brooke Gladstone’s phases a bit, you have the government you deserve. Public opinion survey after survey shows that distrust of the media, and a belief that the media is biased, are both at all-time highs. President Trump’s election came about, in part, as a result of that distrust. So if you’re unhappy about the outcome, you’ll find one leading cause for it just by looking at a mirror.

A lot of media analysts have stated this as well, as have countless editors and reporters working within the profession. One is Derek Thomspon, senior editor of The Atlantic and author of Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in an Age of Distraction. Below is a link to his article citing four main reasons for the distrust. There are more reasons, but this is a strong starting point.

Billy Graham has been on the Gallup Polls as one of the “Ten most admired men in the world” for the past 60 years. His son, Franklin Graham, has a blunt assessment that concurs with President Trump: The media is lying. When the occupant of the White House and major religious leaders agree on an issue as important as this, the owners and managers of newspapers, television news-gathering divisions, and news-based websites had better take notice and change their ways.

Let’s also admit the obvious:  All too often, today’s media has become the pawn (willing or unwitting) of special interests. The WikiLeaks revelations from John Podesta’s emails included the existence of a lengthy list of media members who were “friendly” to Hillary Rodham Clinton’s campaign. It also revealed details about a huge party which dozens of media on her “friendly” list attended, around the time Clinton announced her candidacy for President in Spring 2015. Gallup and other polls show that the public believes the media supports the Democratic Party, by a margin of 3.5 to 1.

 

aaaa-trump-wisconsin

A screen shot of Fox News’ coverage of President Trump’s speech on August 16, 2016

One way the media could begin to redeem itself is to change its direction and focus. Don’t be overly concerned about the White House, but instead look at the plight of the average Jane and Jose in our land. It’s quite telling that Margaret Sullivan, public editor of The New York Times, admits that her newspaper made a mistake by not thoroughly covering the Flint, Michigan, water contamination crisis.

Part of what made journalism great in the last quarter of the 20th century was its ability to focus on what Ed Murrow and Fred Friendly (creators of “See it Now,” the first in-depth television news program) called the little picture. This concept of “comforting the afflicted and afflicting the comfortable,” as stated in a column in the Chicago Evening Post 125 years ago, is something still taught in journalism colleges and universities across the country.

It’s time to refocus. How many more Flints are out there in the nation? If the media returned to a vital role of being a champion of the little people, its reputation would improve.

Now, let’s look at what’s happening at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, in the Executive Office Building, and elsewhere in the Trump Administration, with respect to the media and the practice of journalism.

Mr. President: You gave a prescient speech about six months ago on the campaign trail. On August 16, in Wisconsin, you said this:

Every day you pick up a newspaper, or turn on the nightly news, and you hear about some self-interest banker or some discredited Washington insider says they oppose our campaign. Or some encrusted old politician says they oppose our campaign. Or some big time lobbyist says they oppose our campaign.

“I wear their opposition as a badge of honor. Because it means I am fighting for REAL change, not just partisan change. I am fighting – all of us across the country are fighting – for peaceful regime change in our own country. The media-donor-political complex that’s bled this country dry has to be replaced with a new government of, by and for the people.
(Emphasis added.)

You not only won the election, you defeated the very complex which you eloquently identified on the campaign trail. Now you face a new challenge – Working with at least a portion of the enemies you conquered. Some of them are political. Some are donors. And some are members of the media.

aaa-fake-news-boston-globe

The editorial page “spoof” describing the beginning of (what it hoped would be a fictional) Trump Presidency. This was published as a mock front page in The Boston Globe in April 2016.

Whether or not the media deserves it (in my humble opinion, most don’t), as a statesman and the leader of the world’s greatest democracy, you need the media to report, accurately and fairly, upon your administration and its accomplishments. If democracy is to grow and thrive around the world, then the U.S. media is in a unique position — has a unique responsibility — to broadcast truth and light in places where all too often there are only messages of hate and doom.

They don’t get it. They don’t understand that your usage of Twitter belongs in the same category at John Kennedy’s employment of live TV news conferences or FDR’s radio fireside chats. You are utilizing a newer medium to communicate directly to improve the lives of the people – the oppressed, the downtrodden, and those who seemingly have had no voice and no way to improve their own lives.

Because they don’t get it, you need to exhibit both exceptional leadership and exceptional restraint in showing them a path towards some degree of collaboration and respect for each other.

Here’s a suggestion – Try some one-on-ones. Invite new NBC News President executive Noah Oppenheim to the White House. Have dinner with the New York Times’ Dean Baquet.  Do a two-for and have both Marty Baron (executive editor) and Jeff Bezos (owner) of The Washington Post over for a conversation.

Let them realize that you understand the business challenges and pressures they face. Give them an opportunity to have an exclusive and see if they are willing to work with you or continuously write or broadcast story after story which attacks you.

You have proven that you don’t need the media to campaign and win an election. However, governing is easier if the public isn’t divided and walled off into dozens of “echo chambers” where everyone is seeing and hearing nothing but their own point of view.

Something beyond winning or losing an election is at stake here. E Pluribus Unum should be more than just a motto.  Extend an olive branch from your position as the victor. Media leaders would be wise to accept that offer. Then, just maybe, we can obtain some equilibrium in a land that’s becoming increasingly less civil and more hostile.

Our first president could have been a king, but he wanted a democratic republic to govern the land. George Washington said, “While a courteous behavior is due to all, select the most deserving only for your friendships.”

Try imitating President Washington’s advice, at least for a while, with respect to the media, President Trump. Give them some courtesy, and offer an opportunity for them to change course. It’s in everyone’s best interests – including the nation — that this happens.

shamina merchant john kerezy

John Kerezy with Ohio State University student Shamina Merchant at a presentation at Cuyahoga Community College in spring 2015

I am an associate professor of journalism/mass communications at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C). These views are my own, and not those of Tri-C.

SOURCES:

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/09/why-do-americans-distrust-the-media/500252/

http://www.cnsnews.com/blog/michael-w-chapman/rev-graham-trump-says-what-we-all-know-news-media-has-been-lying-fake-news

https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2016/08/17/donald-trump-speech-with-transcript-the-decisive-moment/

http://www.mountvernon.org/digital-encyclopedia/article/the-rules-of-civility-and-decent-behaviour/

Hanson, Ralph, “Mass Communication,” Sage Publications, sixth edition, pages 127-128

https://ethicsadvicelineforjournalists.org/2016/11/28/fake-news-trumps-true-news/#more-2748

ALSO VISIT:

https://jkerezy.wordpress.com/2015/09/02/media-memo/

https://jkerezy.wordpress.com/2016/03/02/media-memo-2/

 

 

 

 


MEDIA MEMO 2 — Why aren’t we “getting it” about Donald Trump’s primary successes?

March 2, 2016

trump reagan
Screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky foreshadowed the 2016 Presidential election 40 years ago when writing the script for the movie “Network.” In the film, deranged anchorman Howard Beale gains great popularity by screaming, “I’m mad as well, and I’m not going to take it anymore” to the TV cameras.

Change the “I’m” to “we’re,” and you have a 12-word summation of the Donald Trump campaign.

By any assessment, America’s middle class is shrinking and in worse shape in 2016 than it was in 2012, 2008, or 2004 or even in 2000. One powerful question which propelled Ronald Reagan to the White House was this: “Are you better off now than you were four years ago?”  It helped him win in 1980, and then the Reagan Revolution led to a 49-state landslide for the Great Communicator in 1984.

The answer from Trump supporters and opponents alike to Reagan’s 1980 question is a resounding NO. According to the Pew Research Center on social and demographic trends, the share of national income for the middle class fell from 62 percent in 1970 to 43 percent today.

Rasmussen Reports regularly asks this poll question:  Is America headed on the right track or the wrong track?  In the most recent poll, only 30% of respondents said it is on the right track.  Over the past four months, 63% to 67% have said our nation is on the wrong track.

The middle class saw as much as $4.6 trillion awarded to banks and financial institutions “too big to fail” in the 2008 Wall Street bailout, while the unemployment rate soared to 10 percent in Fall 2009. Next, the Obama Administration’s $800 million stimulus plan in 2009 did very little to stimulate the economy.  The promised “shovel ready” jobs rarely existed.

Younger boomers have suffered through the loss of careers and well-paying positions.  Millions liquidated IRAs just to stay afloat, and are now working at lower-wage jobs and are woefully underprepared for retirement

Military veterans and those in uniform still serving our country feel betrayed, not unlike their Vietnam predecessors. Iraq is far from secure, and there’s a feeling that the sacrifices which nearly 7,000 dead and 52,000 wounded Americans made in Afghanistan and Iraq have little value.

Gen Yers and older Millennials are saddled with nearly $1.4 trillion in college loan debt. Many of these younger adult members of our society are feeling scant hope for their future. They are settling for jobs they had as high school graduates or students. Higher-paying jobs and careers concomitant with the college diploma are rare or non-existent.

Additionally, many voters helped elect Barack Obama president believing that it would help improve racial relations in the country. Just the opposite has happened. A PBS NewsHour/Marist College survey this past fall confirms what many of us suspect: 58 percent of Americans say race relations were worse than just one year prior. Significantly, 76 percent of African Americans stated they and whites do NOT have equal opportunity in getting a job, and 87 percent of African Americans believe they do not have the same opportunity in equal justice.

Voters on both ends of the political spectrum feel betrayed and fooled. More than anything, “I’m mad as hell …” explains the popularity of Bernie Sanders as well. Look at the candidates who’ve dropped from the presidential campaign.  With one exception (Carly Fiorina), all are long-time elected office holders.

So – why are we so surprised when a candidate whose slogan is “Make America Great Again” does this well in the primary campaign?  Trump has already inoculated himself against the Political Media Complex, and the more they attack him, the more his popularity is destined to grow. (If you don’t know what the Political Media Complex is, refer to a column I wrote on in in September by linking here:)

https://jkerezy.wordpress.com/2015/09/02/media-memo/

What is really telling is a comparison of turnout in these primary elections so far.  On average, Republican primary elections are drawing an average of 24% MORE voters than they did in 2012. The New York Post attributes this to Trump. I’d rather call it the Howard Beale effect, which Trump has masterfully tapped into so far in the campaign.

LIAR, BUFFOON and FIEND: One or two?

One newspaper account called the candidate a “horrid-looking wretch” who was unfit for office. Other media accounts described him as filthy, a story teller, a despot, a liar, a thief, a braggart and a butcher, as well a liar, buffoon and fiend.

The candidate?  Abraham Lincoln.

Hurling powerful personal attacks against political candidates is nothing new, and it’s been happening since John Adams and Thomas Jefferson opposed each other for the presidency more than 200 years ago.

Those who think Trump winning the Republican nomination for president would destroy the party just don’t understand how the two-party system works in this nation. Sadly, this same system is also advancing a Democratic party candidate whom many voters don’t trust. In January, an ABC News/Washington Post poll revealed that four out of every 10 DEMOCRATS or voters leaning Democrat say they do not trust Hillary Clinton, who will soon be the presumptive Democratic Party nominee. The actual number according to the poll is just 36 percent.

And remember – this is a poll of leaning Democratic voters.

So we are in real danger of the word “liar” becoming one of the most-used words in the 2016 presidential campaign. In light of the realities of raising huge amounts of campaign dollars (something at which Hillary Clinton excels) or spending huge amounts of campaign dollars (something Trump will continue to do), it is a tragic commentary on our two-party system if, in a nation of more than 320 million Americans, the “final two” candidates for President of the United States in 2016 are named Clinton and Trump.

As to the growing negativism on the campaign trail, look no further than Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Every day there are millions of posts from our fellow everyday citizens, saying the most evil and vile things imaginable about various candidates. What’s especially disturbing is the growing number of times when journalists have joined the fray, posting despicable comments about various candidates (most frequently Donald Trump). Every time, within hours the journalist is “forced” to take down the offending post and to apologize. We are rapidly losing civility in our society.

In her terrific 2011 book “The Influencing Machine,” National Public Radio On the Media managing editor Brooke Gladstone simply and eloquently details how the media impacts us.  This is her concluding line: We get the media we deserve.  Sadly, in 2016 it seems that we are getting the candidates we deserve as well.

 

WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO DECENCY?

Max Lucado is an author and pastor at Oak Hills Church in San Antonio, Texas. His blog, reprinted last week in The Washington Post, points out what many in our nation are now saying: A U.S. President should have much better deportment than what Donald Trump is showing on the campaign trail.

Here’s a brief excerpt:

He (Trump) routinely calls people “stupid” and “dummy.” One writer catalogued 64 occasions that he called someone “loser.” These were not off-line, backstage, overheard, not-to-be-repeated comments. They were publicly and intentionally tweeted, recorded and presented.

Lucado is right. He writes that Trump would not pass the “decency interview” he established for his three daughters when guys came calling to date them. He’s not fit to govern, in this pastor’s eyes.

Of course tens of millions of people are disagreeing with Lucado, as expressed in public opinion polls and at the ballot box. Personally, the only solace I’m seeing so far in the 2016 presidential campaign is that I have a still higher calling than that of a U.S. citizen/voter. I belong to a heavenly kingdom, and when I accepted Jesus Christ as my savior it means that his place as Lord is far more important than the occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Romans 13 calls on believers of Christ to be obedient to government authority. If those “final two” candidates for president in 2016 end up being Trump and Clinton, then God is planning for some pruning of our nation. That’s not a pretty thought, but it is about the only explanation that makes sense.

SOURCES:

http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2015/12/09/the-american-middle-class-is-losing-ground/

http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/mood_of_america/right_direction_or_wrong_track

http://www.prwatch.org/news/2010/04/8987/cmd-releases-bailout-tally-46-trillion-federal-funds-disbursed

http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/2012/02/21/Obamas-Stimulus-Plan-What-Worked-What-Didnt

http://collegedebt.com/

http://nypost.com/2016/02/23/rea son-for-record-republican-voter-turnout-trump/

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/02/24/newt-gingrich-2012-the-overture-to-donald-trump-2016/

http://millercenter.org/president/biography/lincoln-campaigns-and-elections

http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNS14000000

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/race-relations-low-point-recent-history-new-poll-suggests/

http://hotair.com/archives/2016/01/27/wapoabc-poll-hillarys-trustworthiness-down-to-36-among-democrats/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2016/02/26/max-lucado-trump-doesnt-pass-the-decency-test/